Northern California Conference Office Relocation

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Back in the early days of Adventism in California, many locations for the headquarters were considered: Sacramento, Woodland, Sant Rosa, to name a few. Eventually the headquarters was settled in Oakland, where it remained until the early 1970’s. The Oakland building was old and too small, so a search was initiated in the late 1960’s for a new location. Eventually land out in countryside around Pleasant Hill was located and a new office building was constructed to be the new headquarters for the Northern California Conference.

For many years there have been talks of possibly moving the conference office from the Bay area to the Sacramento region. In the fall of 2004, for example, the conference formed a committee to study that possibility concluding that there were good reasons to relocate should an appropriate opportunity arise. Recently a number of things have come together to suggest that this may be the time.

Some of the reasons identified in favor of moving the office to Roseville include:

  • Roseville is more geographically central to the territory served. This means better access to the office by more members and easier access to more churches for the conference office employees.
  • The majority of our churches and schools are within two hours of Roseville. Much fewer are with two hours of Pleasant Hill.
  • More of our members live in the greater Sacramento region than any other part of our territory. This adds to the above point and also helps to have a larger pool of Seventh-day Adventist members to hire office staff and recruit volunteer help.
  • The cost of living in the Sacramento region continues to be significantly less than the Bay area. While the costs are rising in Sacramento, they are still rising at a much slower rate than the Bay Area. The Bay Area continues to outpace much of the country, not only in cost of housing, but in the rate that those costs are rising. This is largely due to the land-locked nature of the Bay area while Sacramento still has large tracts of land available for development.
  • These factors may result in a long-term cost saving for operating the office. Lower cost of operating means that savings over time can be quite significant.
  • Having a lower cost of living area makes it easier to recruit new employees from out of the area when openings occur.
  • This current opportunity appears to make good financial sense. The Roseville building is being offered to us at a reduced rate by Adventist Health. At the same time, we have an unsolicited offer on the current building that makes the transition work without creating any debt.

Due to those and other reasons, the administration and executive committee of the Northern California Conference is recommending to the constituency that it pass an action to enable administration to move forward in purchasing the Roseville property and relocating the conference headquarters to that location.